Blog Archives

The Monkey or the Envelope. The choice is yours.

Icon for Post #3726

Hootville continues to invest its time and dollars in Facebook advertising. Generally the results are rather good by which we mean that we are paying a pleasingly low cost for each desired action we receive. A desired action might be for a viewer of the ad to click the Like button or click through to our website or engage with the Facebook post. In other words we are getting people to interact with the ad at a low cost.

social media copywriting advice

Will the red ink take us to black ink? (Accounting reference.)

For copywriters and marketers there’s a great deal of interest in uncovering the ads which get results and those which don’t. Rarely have copywriters and marketers been able to so scientifically alter a single variable and gauge the impact. There are three key variables with which one can play:

1. The ad itself. The creative – meaning the imagery, the copywriting, the fundamental proposition, the tone.

2. Audience demographics – age, location, interests, gender etc.

3. Deployment of the ad – will it show on mobile devices only, desktops only, in the Newsfeed or on the right hand side?

Each of these factors can vary the results. Sometimes what we think will work, works. Sometimes it doesn’t. Changing one factor at a time allows direct comparison. Let the games begin.

facebook advertising comparison

Who can resist monkeys doing human things? (We read his work BTW. Not much good - basically a rehash of Jungle Book.)

We’re promoting Copy Savvy 101 (in case you don’t know) so have been running Facebook ads. This week we created two different ads which we ran simultaneously. We kept the audience demographics and deployment the same for each but the two creative approaches were entirely different.

The audience we were targeting was people like you: 28-55, any sex, interests in marketing, nonprofits and / or small business, attractive, tertiary qualified, living in Victoria.

The ads ran on mobile devices in the Newsfeed only. The Envelope ad is based on a post we wrote long ago. We think that the image is quite strong and the copy rather clever and meaningful to copywriters. The Monkey ad was hoping to interest and disarm people with a cute image. The results were very different, so much so that we stopped running one a few days in.

OK – over to you. Which was more successful in gaining more clicks? Envelope or Monkey? Place your guess in the comments section below. Have a snap poll around the office. Alienate those which guess incorrectly. We’ll reveal the answer in 48hr.

Meanwhile read our recent Facebook advertising post, which explains more of the basics.

May 1: Winner revealed:

facebook advertising that works

May I have the envelope please...and the winner is...the envelope!

As you can see the Monkey should stick to writing right wing editorials for News Corp because he’s been outperformed by the envelope.  As an advertiser you want to minimise your cost per click. 41c fore the envelope vs $1.12 for the monkey? Which would you rather pay to have someone click on your Facebook ad? Our state-educated maths shows that the envelope was about 60% cheaper per click than the monkey. That’s huge. But why? Here’s our best guesses:

The envelope image was somewhat intriguing. The monkey was just silly.

The copy accompanying the envelope was clever and knowing. We’ve always taken a tone that assumes Hootville’s audiences to be savvy (somewhat cynical) professionals. The copy accompanying the monkey was straight; maybe too straight.

facebook CTR comparison

We've always said: if you pay peanuts you'll get a low CTR.

Complications: It’s easy to assume that a lower cost per click indicates a superior creative approach but the price you pay per click isn’t the best measure the effectiveness of your creative approach. Facebook has a dynamic pricing policy akin to an auction system so the price you pay is influenced by factors beyond the appeal of your ad. Other factors include the number of other advertisers also attempting to reach your audience and how much they are willing to pay. More competition = higher cost even for the same ad.

The click through rate (CTR) is the purest way to assess how appealing / effective your creative is. This measures the percentage of people who saw your ad and then – bless them – clicked on it. Let’s compare our two ads again. Less than one in 100 people (0.792%) clicked on the monkey ad (see above). The envelope proved much more appealing with a marked difference in its power over men (1.134%) and women (1.604%). That’s a whopping 40% difference between the sexes.

facebook CTR male and female

Men are from Mars, women click through more often.

Beyond ego gratification there’s another reason to aim for a higher CTR. The higher your CTR, the less you pay. Why? Facebook wants its ads clicked so it is more likely to show an ad with a high CTR for less money, to your audience, more often. Win / win. We’d love to hear of higher CTRs. And if you’ve gained from this post we’d love you to share it. Finally; if you’ve gained from this, please share it with some friends and be sure to subscribe to our email – the Hootville Lowdown.
Tagged ,

Dealing with nasty Facebook comments

Icon for Post #2907

Of all the concerns nonprofits have about Facebook, the challenge of dealing with nasty comments ranks at the very top. Even higher than getting more comments in the first place.

This video shows you how to deal with mean spirited Facebook comments from a technical perspective. (Yes you can block people.)

social media policy advice

Pity the fool who has to reply to these spirited Facebookers.

But above and beyond the technical is the cultural. Interaction is key to being successful on social media – they don’t call it “social” for nothing. The ability to make comments is an attraction to Facebook. You want comments, as one comment makes a second comment more likely and so on. This rings true for comments in the positive or negative.

Hootville promotes the idea of a social media playbook as opposed to social media policy. Policies tend to be heavy on the don’ts and light on the dos. Part of any nonprofit’s social media playbook should be how to deal with unacceptable comments.

How do you define ‘unacceptable’ beyond the blatantly privacy-breaching, malicious, threatening and unsubstantiated? What if someone writes: “I used to use your service but I found Service X and they are so much better. More friendly and half the price. Losers!” 

Will you let that stay visible? Will you reply? We hope so. Some nonprofits are affronted by anything that isn’t blatantly positive but copping critical comments with dignity, grace and humour is a good look. Something like:

“We don’t see ourselves as losers but we are sorry to lose you. Anyhow we are happy you’ve found a new service that pleases you.”

Have a policy to write back to such comments that are close to, but don’t step over the line. Even better, you may find that others who are part of your socal media networks step in to defend and praise you.

And remember – not everyone who reads what you write believes you, even when you are being sincere and helpful. The same goes double for people leaving critical, nasty comments on your Facebook wall. Most often the only people who look bad are the commenters.

Tagged , , ,

Facebook changes for nonprofits afoot

Icon for Post #2266

We’re Facebook cynics. Longer term Citizens know that we feel Facebook’s EdgeRank system is an immovable object separating you from you fans / friends. (In fact we wrote five posts about Facebook last year, each one a gem.) Hootville gets it greatest response from email, then Twitter. Facebook is cooler than shouting out the window and about equally as effective. Social media is a funny bugger to deal with.

facebook for nonprofits

Of course, if you are a global force use Facebook and its new look design. For the rest of us...

Anyhoo Facebook is rolling out changes for its Pages format which is popular with many nonprofits and their corporate cousins. Have an ogle at these early adopting Facebook-lovin’ nonprofits.  

It’s easy to argue that the new look is more appealing visually. It’s a lot more like a Welcome Tab (a special landing tab for your Facebook visitors as opposed to immediately seeing your Wall) which we’ve been recommending as the best way to improve your Facebook Page performance.

Our tough love advice? Tweet and invest in a website that is updated very regularly and encourages comments and interaction. Use email and Twitter to drive traffic to it.  have you checked which channels drive traffic to your site? We have but we still use Facebook anyway. For now.

Do you get value from Facebook? Comments welcome.

Tagged , ,

best Facebook pages for organisations

Icon for Post #2048
social media training

Most leading Facebook pages implore visitors to like them. (Desperados.)

Whenever Brett delivers Online Savvy 101 he gets a chance to spread his discontent with Facebook which he believes underdelivers for many organisations. Here; to counterbalance his negativity are a bunch of 15 Facebook pages from organisations (corporate) that all have good habits worth copying.

This is the sort of content that is covered in the December 1 webinar Social Media Savvy 101. Is learning how to use Facebook and Twitter more effectively worth two hours and $200?

 

 

Tagged , ,

copywriting, social media, eNewsletter and SEO webinars

Icon for Post #1814

It’s official. The internet is for more than just online shopping and pornography. It’s also for training. For the first time we’re offering a smattering of our training via webinar for everyone, everywhere:

Copywriting Savvy 101: write copy worth reading. We ignore spelling and grammar to look at writing in the real world. Improve your releases, letters to editors, opinion pieces, appeal letters, CEO columns and more. How? Well how about getting to know your audiences first, developing a copywriting brief and getting those in charge to adhere to an editorial code of conduct? Plus we’ll work on quotes, headlines, captions and more. (New additional session) Thursday October 20 at 12.30am. Read more…

SEO Savvy 101: Help your website meet friends and influence people as it rises to the top of the Google heap. Nonprofit-related search terms are (relatively) uncompetitive – page one is there for the taking. Our achievable, inexpensive, minimally-nerdy ways to improve your search engine results can be actioned immediately. This is aimed at anyone wanting more from their website – marketers, fundraisers, volunteer co-ordinators and CEOs – not techie types. Thursday October 27, 10am to noon. Read more

Social Media Savvy 101: move from using social media to exploiting it. Learn to battle Facebook’s EdgeRank system and discover ways to build a cult-like Twitter following. Also: finding and deciding content, dealing with negative comments, when to post. We’ll look at nonprofits using social media to its best advantage and yes, we’ll overview Google+. Thursday December 1, 10am to noon. Read more…

eNewsletter / eMarketing Savvy 101: eNewsletters aren’t sexy but they reach more people, more reliably creating more response other options. Save thousands of dollars while reaching thousands of people. Agenda: moving from Outlook to a genuine eNewsletter system, creating and building databases, analysing statistics, finding the right content, trigger emails, tricks of the trade. Thursday December 8, 10am to 12.30pm. Read more…

Of course you can always commission a webinar or workshop for your group. Dozens do and and they’re all getting smarter than you courtesy of: Media Savvy 101, Marketing Savvy 101, Speak Savvy 101 and Online Savvy 101.

Webinars and workshops are backed with notes and follow-up coaching. Glowing testimonials, details and bookings at www.hootville/training or call Brett de Hoedt, Mayor of Hootville Communications 03 9017 1062.      

 

Tagged , , , , , ,

Like me. Really, really like me. Say something. Please.

Icon for Post #1902

Direct from the Department of Duh comes this revealing observation: asking people to like or comment on your Facebook leads to more likes and comments. A lot more.

Likes are easier to extract than comments. Do you ask? How often?

Is this important beyond ego gratification? Oh yes.

As we have said here, here, here and here  and here  and here and here creating interactions leads to a better EdgeRank meaning more of your Facebook content will be shared to more people, more often.

BTW – if you find this post at all helpful please use the social media buittons below to spread it.

Tagged , ,

Use Google Analytics to track your social media

Icon for Post #1652
Google Analytics dashboard

The truth, the whole truth and...

If you have a website you need to measure its performance. Duh.

Chances are you use Google Analytics, (left) which is free and effective though there is a delay in its results which can be frustrating if you want to know if the tweet you just sent out has lead to a spike in web traffic.

Anyhow now Google Analytics can also measure your social media stats as this article from the always helpful SocialMedia Examiner attests.

Mind you…just how many of us check our stats more than…quarterly? These are the sort of tough questions asked in Online Savvy 101.

Tagged , , ,

social media training in Melbourne

Icon for Post #1584
social media training for fclcv

With this training under their belts equality before the law will just be a matter of time.

The Federation of Community Law Centres Victoria has booked Hootville Communications to deliver social media training to a swag of its members in Melbourne Wednesday August 3. We’ll train members in the smarter use of Facebook and Twitter plus we’ll look at getting more from websites. It’s essentially an abridged Online Savvy 101 workshop.

Tagged , ,

Beating Facebook and EdgeRank into submission

Icon for Post #1523

OK you know by now that interaction from your friends with your Facebook content is vital. So what gets the interaction started? Try these:

facebook polls create interaction

Vote early, vote often.

Polls – regular, quick, fun or serious. Polls are interactive by nature.

Facebook advice

Open up a conversation.

Ask for comments – studies prove that asking for comments creates more comments. Who knew? Yep it’s obvious but how much of what you write on your Facebook page is questioning and how much is telling?

Facebook photos improve EdgeRank

Pictures tell thousands of words. Many about dachshunds.

Photos insist on interaction as they are small and need clicking for a fair display. Studies show that videos – yours or someone elses – have far greater power over readers than text alone. 

Facebook EdgeRank likes links

You're only as strong as your weakest...

Links - particularly when they are to sites other than your own – show your readers that you care about more than just generating traffic.

Tagged , , ,

A beastly Facebook experiment

Icon for Post #1462
Facebook advice

Maybe there's hope yet...

We’re all about EdgeRank at the moment and so should you if you’re in charge of a Facebook page. This piece by Thomas E Weber of The Daily Beast summarises one man’s attempt to go viral via Facebook. As you’ll read, most of us have developed an immunity.

Lazy (aka busy) citizens should skip to points six and nine as they offer hope to the devious (aka innovative).

Tagged , , ,