Blog Archives

NOW BOOKING: Presentation Savvy October 10, Melbourne

Icon for Post #5490
public speaking course melbourne

Hotel Lindrum, October 10, 2016.

Public speakers don’t just talk to conferences. They talk to clients, colleagues, donors and shareholders.

If you talk to people as part of your job you are a public speaker. Get the public speaking training you need to be a dramatically better public speaker in Melbourne on Monday, October 10.

Our Presentation Savvy workshop (previously called Present Savvy) is small, intense, fun and comes with follow-up coaching.  The catering is pretty darn good too.

Don’t wait for the next workshop. Two places have already been snapped up by Cochrane Australia and the University of NSW so book today. Here’s the details you crave.

Three new public workshops in Melbourne

Icon for Post #5381

media training in melbourneAt last – we announce three public workshops for Melbourne:

Copy Savvy – Monday September 12

Online Savvy – Wednesday September 14

Interview Savvy – Thursday September 15

Small groups & follow-up coaching. Dramatic improvement guaranteed.

Every workshop is now better value with more coaching and / or other benefits.

Each of the three workshops has an earlybird special – the first few to book will have their follow-up coaching doubled. Yep, doubled.

Don’t wait to be a savvier communicator.

Digital marketing workshop feedback

Icon for Post #5141
online marketing training

sensational

Last week Brett delivered Online Savvy to 15 or so souls from the age care sector brought together by Aged and Community Services Australia. Here’s some feedback:

Training was very specifically focused on the issues that community aged care organisations are facing. Concepts very clearly explained and workshop clearly structured. I [now] have a more in-depth knowledge of how to formulate/ revise our online marketing strategy. Some very relevant insights. Made all participants feel comfortable to ask any questions.

Would recommend? Yes.

Zoe Angeli, Fronditha Care

Clear information and direction re what is important and where the focus should be in terms of effectiveness. Felt confident and able to go back to management with a plan for marketing direction and emphasis. Very valuable. I could ask questions without feeling embarrassed of any ignorance. Brett is familiar with the resource restrictions, both human and financial, in the not for profit sector.

Would recommend? Yes.

Suzanne Russell, Olivet Aged Persons Home

 

 

 

Tagged

new marketing savvy workshop website join the internet

Icon for Post #5032
marketing workshop in melbourne

Visit our Marketing Savvy website for all the details.

Finally something worth looking at has hit the internet. We speak of the standalone website for Marketing Savvy. The workshop is available to anyone, anywhere anytime but we’re also staging a public session in Melbourne on Tuesday February 9 2016. Join us super quick and we might just double your coaching.

Tagged

Public marketing and communications training workshops in Melbourne

Icon for Post #4987

Hootville announces new dates for four more public workshops in Melbourne aimed at marketers, communicators and media spokespeople.

If you run an NFP, government authority or small business this is for you. And yes – you can book a workshop for your own organisation anytime and yes, we will be bringing these to Sydney in 2016.

media training workshop

The worm awaits.

Earlybird bonus: the first four people to book for each session will have their follow-up coaching period doubled. That can mean two years of free coaching.

Media Savvy is for publicists and all those who desire a share of the media spotlight. Thursday January 28, 2016. What’s regular media coverage worth to you? (One earlybird place remaining as of December 21.)

Marketing Savvy is for marketerssalespeople, one-person businesses and CEOs.  Tuesday February 23, 2016. Get to know your own brand, your audience and your marketing options. (Earlybirds remain as of Dec 21.)

Online Savvy for those who manage websites, eMarketing and social media; Tuesday March 1, 2016. Because the internet isn’t just a phase we’re going through. (One earlybird place remains as of Dec 21.)

Speak Savvy media training for media spokespeople; Thursday March 3, 2016. Learn to inspire, persuade as well as inform. (Earlybirds remain as of Dec 21.)

This is the same training delivered to the Australian Swim Team, Al Gore Climate Reality Training Corp, Australian Conservation Foundation, Landcare, WWF, Berry Street, Australian Red Cross, Fundraising Institute of Australia, Sustainability Victoria, Finance Sector Union, St Vincent Institute, Australian Climate Commission, Netball Australia, endless local governments and hundreds more organisations.

Trainer Brett de Hoedt delivered a half-day marketing session to members of Vicsports in November 2015. Here’s some of the feedback:

“A fabulous session.”

“I could have listened all day – engaging, informative and entertaining!”

“I laughed so much and learnt a great deal also and you cant get better than that!!”

“What an informative and interactive session you delivered yesterday!”

“Loved your presentation.”.

“Learnt so much.”

All workshops feature:

  • practical, actionable, proven advice;
  • endless Q&A;
  • follow-up coaching;
  • tantilising early bird offers;
  • small classes, delightful venue and supportive colleagues;
  • comprehensive notes;
  • a culture that is energetic and challenging;
  • a range of fees to suit you.

We rarely offer public training workshops, so take advantage of these opportunities. Of course you can always email or call 0414 713 802 to request a private session.

Tagged ,

Thoughts you don’t want audiences to think #4

Icon for Post #4811
public speaking training workshops

Have mercy, be interesting.

#4 “Boring!”

Audiences are generally very forgiving though there is one unforgivable
sin – being boring.

You need to grab an audience’s attention and keep it throughout your presentation. That’s why those first minutes are so
important.

It’s when your audience will devote more of its attention to you than at any other point in the presentation. Don’t waste it.

Be funny, be provocative, be candid, be contrarian, be excited – just don’t be
boring. The worst thing you can do is to look as if you have been sent by your
boss to deliver the presentation on her behalf.

Look like you want to be there – whether you want to be or not. Remember that no matter how dry your topic, how important the content nor how much information you wish to convey everything goes down better when audiences are interested.

Hootville is running a public Presentation Savvy workshop Thursday December 7  for everyone who needs to improve their public speaking whether it be to audiences of 1 or 1000.

Tagged

public speakers – thought that you don’t want your audience to think #3

Icon for Post #4798

#3 Get to the good bit

public speaker workshop melbourne

Cut to the chase!

We recently watched this TED talk which we suspect is a career highlight of the
presenter Tasha Eurich. As per TED and TEDX talks everywhere, countless hours of preparation physical, mental and spiritual were invested in a very brief, high-pressure presentation.

public speaking workshop sydney

Enough with the build up already, already.

Despite having just 15 minutes to speak– on perhaps the greatest platform she will ever get – Eurich wastes the first four minutes before offering anything of value.

That is too long for a 45 minute presentation let alone something as short as this. Inexcusable.

The first three minutes are vital. KPMG partner and high-profile demographer Bernard Salt does not waste a breath before launching into his presentation. He delivers knowledge, humour and an audience-specific reference within 60 seconds. The audience has barely settled in their seats before they have received some value. Bingo!

melbourne media trainer

Quicksticks!

‘Value’ is a word you hear a lot today in relation to marketing, content marketing, public presentations.

The value you offer has to be clear to you and the audience. Stop with the overviews, the introductions and the thankyous. Forget any apologies for seeming a little stressed / tired /flustered.

Deliver some value. That might be in the form of a story, a fact, a contention, a gag, an audience participation exercise just don’t wait for the big finish.

Tagged

Public speaking – 11 thoughts you don’t want your audience to think

Icon for Post #4712

Too few public speakers make the most of their opportunity and very few in Australia take any public speaking training. It’s easy for public speakers to think that their presentation went well as very few audience members express their true feelings. Event managers are often more concerned with punctuality and logistics than content, so presenters can live in a bubble.

However if we delve into the minds of audience members we’d often find thoughts like those featured in this series:

Thoughts you don’t want your audience to think.

Whether you speak to conference rooms or board rooms, to policy advisers or prospects, avoid these thoughts by attending our upcoming our public Present Savvy workshops or book your own today.

Thought #1: “Duh!”

public speaking training

Tell them something they don’t know.

There’s a fine line between explaining what needs to be explained and teaching people to suck eggs. Many public speakers are worried about bringing the audience along with them so they explain everything from the ground up. They give background, they show organisational flowcharts, they treat audiences as students rather than fellow professionals. Don’t do this.

A client of ours recently ran through a presentation that she was planning to make to a room full of nutritionists. The thrust of the presentation was about how a low socio-economic school compensated for the poor nutrition kids were getting at home through their breakfast plan and other means.

Our client opened up by explaining the link between good nutrition and good student learning. You know the deal – as a well fed tummy provides the ability to concentrate so students get the most out of each and every class. That’s fine but she went on to explain this in great depth and at some length in the context of a 30 minute presentation.

I gave her feedback that a room full of nutritionists do not need to be told of the benefit to students of a healthy diet. They already get it. The nutritionists really wanted to learn about her school’s program so they could steal ideas and recreate its success.

Be careful not to tell your audience what they already know. It takes only a couple of minutes for an audience to sense that you are underestimating them. This is usually interpreted as a sign of disrespect and they disengage accordingly.

Of course you may have to cover some old ground or find some common understandings but liberal use of phrases such as: “you already know this but…” or “I hardly need to tell a room like this that…” show that you understand and respect them. It also makes audiences feel smart.

Hootville is running a public Speak Savvy workshop Wednesday November 11 for everyone who needs to improve their public speaking to audiences of 1 or 1000. 

Thought #2: “Is she ever going to shut up?” 

Public speakers need to find a way to involve their audience whether they want to or not.

public speaking training Melbourne

Make them believe you care about them.

I like to have some degree of continuous interaction with an audience which can take the form of short, sharp questions such as:

  • Has anyone else here experienced that?
  • Anyone here in violent disagreement with what I just said?
  • Has anyone read that book/seen that documentary/used that software?

Your audience can respond via a quick comment, a show of hands or with a low murmur. It’s a small way to show that you give a damn about your audience and you just might learn something from their response that you can reflect in your presentation. You must find a way to let people in your audience participate. Q & A at the end isn’t enough.

media training australia

A book your audiences will love.

Serious about being a better speaker? You should be. Better speaking = better career.

Download our free PDF eBook Speak Savvy and book in to our workshop Present Savvy.

Tagged ,

NEW: Present Savvy public speaking workshop

Icon for Post #4656
Tips for public speakers

Who knows where your presentation skills will take you.

Hootville has launched a new public speaking training workshop: Present Savvy.

Unlike our media-centric media training workshop Speak Savvy, Present Savvy is for people who present as part of their job.

If you present to prospective clients, students, funders or partners you need Speak Savvy.

As always, it’s practical, fun, challenging and backed-up with 12 months of unlimited follow-up training.

Rightly or wrongly audiences judge you and your organisation on how well you present which is why you should find out more.

 

Behold the public speaking pyramid

Icon for Post #4518
book for public speaking

Read this, get savvy, speak better.

There’s a lot of public speaking advice out there (our new free eBook Speak Savvy for instance) and no wonder – many people loathe the thought of a quick presentation to workmates. A keynote presentation to 1000 peers is enough to render many mute and let’s not even mention speaking to media.

That’s a shame because presenters who are engaging, confident and knowledgeable are seen as smarter, better leaders and are more likely to get their way compared to people of equal experience and IQ who cannot command attention. That’s showbiz.

So what makes a “good public speaker” “good”? Well we took a cue from nutritionists who – like the Egyptians – created a pyramid long ago that still gets referred to today. Say hello to the public speaking pyramid.

public speaking advice

It all starts with knowledge. Note the lack of whole grains, dairy or legumes in this pyramid.

The good news is that being a strong speaker is all based on knowledge. Many speakers and speaker trainers tacitly believe that it’s possible to compensate for a lack of real knowledge and specific experience with some YouTube videos, a loud voice and a silly ice-breaking activity. It isn’t.

One of the best presentations Brett ever saw was delivered by a woman with no PowerPoint, no audience activities, no dramatic pauses and certainly no honed TED-style personal stories. She hadn’t taken our Present Savvy workshop.

public speakign trainer australia

Deb with late great Joan Kirner, former Premier of Victoria.

The speaker was Debbie Kilroy and she spoke from the heart from her own personal experience about a topic that held 1000 people enthralled – women in prison. She didn’t even move from behind the lectern but her knowledge and expertise was so compelling, authentic and unique that she killed. (Showbiz talk for “excelled”.) Knowledge works – that’s why it’s the base of our public speaking pyramid. You need multiple servings of this.

Knowledge is more than facts – it’s what you and you alone can explain. It’s your experiences and perspectives. As we emphasise to our Present Savvy participants, if your content is compelling, robust and valuable nobody regrets the missing videos, dramatic pauses or audience participation. Nobody misses the entrance and exit music when the speaker is smart and helpful. So be smart and helpful.

Consider this range of response.

So how was the speaker today, dear?

Option A.

Super confident and he had all these cool graphics but I don’t know what makes him an expert in waste water treatment. We all knew as much as he did. 

Option B

Yeah – pretty good.  Not exactly a bundle of laughs but there was nothing about waste water the guy didn’t know.  I learnt some stuff for sure.

 

Stories & examples

public speaking stories

Stories work for grown ups as well as they do for kids.

Your knowledge needs to be brought to life. It must be transferred; given colour and be made comprehensible. Great public speakers liberally pepper their stagetime with examples and stories which are selected to be both representative, memorable and moving.

Of all the content you deliver on stage, your stories and examples are most likely to stay with audiences after the show. Good speakers take time to find examples that hit home with audiences. Note – the stories don’t have to be about you. They needn’t be long – they might be more a personal reflection or reminiscence.

Do you use examples or stories? Do they illuminate? Have you practiced how you tell them? We guarantee every speaker we train that we can improve their stories and examples.

Why stories? Empathy is in short supply. Humans presume their own lives to be complex but others peoples’ situation to be simple. The right story or example will reveal nuance. It might drill down and highlight the moment something changed. Stories and examples, like this one from leading introvert Susan Cain might inject some humour or humanity. It should offer you a way to explain something beyond just straight talking. Stories help your messages sink in.

Consider this range of response.

How was that speaker at work today dear?

Option A

Not bad. Total expert in her field – nothing she didn’t know about recruiting staff but I don’t know exactly how any of it was particularly relevant to me.

Option B

Not bad. Total expert in her field – nothing she didn’t know about recruiting staff. She gave us this case study of a business that is a lot like us. The company went from employer of last resort to an employer of choice. There was definitely stuff I can use.

 

Engagement & Exercises

public speaker australia

Doing sometimes beats talking.

Speakers and presenters have a message to get across. Otherwise why even bother? To get your message across you MUST engage the audience. Many public speakers are too meek to take control. Get over this self-imposed limitation. It can be as simple as a quick audience poll or as extravagant as having 1000 people form teams to build constructions out of pasta. (Dried not fresh.)

Audiences may claim to be tired of group exercises. Liars! Appropriate, well explained, well executed activities leave audiences enlivened. Exercises break up slabs of talk and allow people who have different learning styles to thrive. Engaging exercises showcase the speaker’s prowess as a presenter and elevate your contribution from speaking to presenting. Exercises make your contribution more memorable. No engagement = no attention. Note – the exercises must relate to your content and message somehow.

Consider this range of response.

“So how was the conference dear?”

Option A

Good. One speaker was talking about how hard it is to come to Australia as a refugee.

Option B

Good. One speaker was talking about how hard it is to come to Australia as a refugee. She did this thing where she handed out forms to enrol your kid in daycare, rent a home and apply for a mortgage but instead of being in English the forms were 50% in English and 50% in Arabic and asked us to complete the forms. Impossible.”

Another example

“So how was the conference dear?”

Option A

We had this sales expert who talked about how important it was to have really great answers to frequently held objections from our customers.

Option B

We had this sales expert who talked about how important it was to have really great answers to frequently held objections from our customers. She had half the room come up with the objections and half the group come up with the responses. The responders had three minutes to come up with their answers and we voted on which group had the best responses. Honestly – the difference between some of the responses to the same objections was horrifying.

 

Audio / visual

The ante has been well and truly upped in this regard. There are some super slick videos and infographics out there being used to full effect by presenters. Undoubtedly they can be the icing on the cake but they are no substitute for knowledge, examples and stories and engagement.

powerpoint mistakes

A picture is worth a thousand words. It should not contain 1000 words.

The use and abuse of PowerPoint is an old chestnut but like the weather everyone complains but nobody does anything about it. If you use it (and you do have a choice) use it lightly to illuminate, clarify and entertain. We have plenty of tips in our free PDF eBook: Speak Savvy.

If you depend on videos to bring home your point make them A) your own B) not utterly familiar C) relevant to your message D) short.

I place audio / visual at the top of the public speaking pyramid – it’s a bonus not a basic. Yet most presenters will spend far longer on their PowerPoint than refining their stories or devising an engaging audience exercise.

You stand more chance of moving someone with an exercise than a slide.

So how was that speech you went to?

Option A

Pretty good. She played that video of the gorilla and the basketballers. They all use that. Then she played some American TV ad to get some message across about collaboration. It a bloody commercial for a mobile phone – who cares?

Option B.

Pretty good. She showed this video from one of her workshops. She interviewed participants before and after about teamwork. She turned some absolute lone wolves into collaborators. Maybe she could do something with our team.

 

Stagecraft

The icing on the pyramid cake (pardon the mixed metaphor) is stagecraft. ‘Serious’ speakers – those who land big fat speaking fees – have made much of stagecraft including: pauses, mime, roaming, whispering, costume changes, props and chants.

If and only if you have

  • knowledge,
  • stories & examples;
  • engagement & exercises;
  • audio visual;

all sorted then and only then can some cunning stagecraft help lift you to the speaking stratosphere.

presenting about climate change

Ok – some gimmicks work pretty well. For former Vice Presidents.

I have seen (endured) speakers who come with sherpas laden with paraphrenalia. Home videos, props, role plays, songs and dances.

This is a trait of the non-expert who covers a lack of real experiences and smarts under an icing of showbiz. I am all for showbiz – but as the dessert, not the main course.

 

So how was the conference dear?

Option A

There was this sort of ‘motivational’ speaker woman – my God! She cried, she sang, she came out wearing this glittery ball gown. She talked about her childhood and her corporate career but I’m not sure how recent any of that was. Some of us were wondering afterward – what exactly was she here for?

Option B

There was this woman – my God! She was amazing. Quite theatrical – she showed us all these pictures of herself growing up around the world. She sang a little song but what I got out of it was that collaboration is built from four key shared values.

book for public speaking

For anyone who speaks to other people as part of their work.

If that’s given you food for thought download the free PDF eBook Speak Savvy.

It’s full of ways to be a great presenter on stages small or large.

And find out what two of our training workshops can do for you. Speak Savvy is for those wanting to bask in the media spotight. Present Savvy makes you a savvier presenter to audiences big or small, clients and stakeholders..

- Brett de Hoedt, Mayor of Hootville.

Tagged , ,
Page 1 of 212